Open Carry in Texas

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No retention device

Texas Governor Abbott just signed open carry into law in his state. Only a handful of states do not allow open carry but the question I have is why would you want to.
Law Enforcement open carry and even though they represent the law people still try to take their guns from them, thus they have for the most part ACTIVE retention holsters. That retention device will keep the gun in the holster while being physically active but passive retention would suffice. Seriously, a determined adversary who wants that cops gun is going to go for regardless of consequence. It is said that during the struggle in Furgeson MO the bad guy did in fact try to take the LEOs gun and received a wound in the hand during that process. SO . . .

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No retention device

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Passive retention will not stop a determined assailant.


Why would you want to walk around with your gun exposed with nothing more than a snap strap to prevent some person with evil intent from trying to take you gun. I would much prefer no one know I have a gun on my person. Why tempt some guy much bigger than me, who has the ability to literally rip my head off with his bare hands.

In looking at pictures of citizens carrying openly the majority have nothing but friction retention. The few I found with active retention were snap straps or trigger guard buttons. And the question is, how quickly can the owner of that gun be able to defeat the retention device and get the gun into play . . . assuming they even practice their drawstroke other than at the range. Are you ready for the Safariland ALS retention system? It seems like a high price to pay in terms of accessibility just so I don’t have to wear a cover garment.

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This is silly. The gun is not even in Condition One.

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How easy would it be to disarm this person?


There is the argument that carrying open would allow people to dress as they like and to carry a bigger gun. Well guess what, that just sounds lazy. I have many students who carry full size. Ron and I carry full size often. No one sees our guns and I really have not changed how I dress.

While I support the idea that every one should legally carry and wish more did I personally am not interested in carrying open. I do not see how it benefits society on a whole because I believe one armed concealed carrying person is a greater force multiplier than one open carrying person. If the bad guys know there are people armed out there why should we make it easy for them to identify us.

Your thoughts on open carry?

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Failing to train IS training to fail.
Liberty Firearms Training – See more


 

What is Training?

There are a few universal drills, standards and qualifiers I use regularly. I go alone or with friends and students. As for training with others I’m not certain without an expert present that self-training can only lead to engrained habits of poor tactics and form.

There are a lot of terms used in firearms training, and often this can cause confusion. I like to think of training with four parts aligned with the Triad of Armed Self-Defense; knowledge, training, practice and measuring. Some of this can be done individually, some with friends but I’ve found it best to always have someone with expertise present.

12295317_1130868466932379_4071258422283863048_nKnowledge is learning about shooting. It’s a passive activity to a large extent. In a LCDT class this is where you will spend 75% or more of your time, being lectured on guns, technique and even to some degree tactics.

Training is where you take action and learn to apply the knowledge you’ve gathered. Ideally, you should have an expert who can make necessary corrections and instruct you on how to get to the point of competence more quickly. I’m not a fan of videoing my practice session but many use it to good benefit. Training is what you get from a professional instructor.

Practice is where the rubber meets the road. This is where you turn knowledge and training into actions you can execute unconsciously under stress. You can practice on your own or with a group using live fire and dry fire. But you want to make sure you’re disciplined about it. 10 minutes of perfect practice daily is way more effective than two hours of randomly throwing rounds downrange once a week/month.

IMG_1928Measuring your ability and the effectiveness of your training and practice is a critical element in learning, it is taking the test to see how well you perform over time and it will decidedly tell you what stage of learning you have reached. You can test yourself with a timer and a scored drill, with friends in informal competition and in formal competition like IDPA or USPSA.

There are four levels of competence in learning or mastering a physical skill; unconscious incompetence, conscious incompetence, conscious competence and unconscious competence. We tell our students that by the end of a class they will be consciously competent but will lose it quickly if they do not practice what they have learned. We often see students a year or two later who have zero skills, just like the day they first came to a class because they had not practiced. Shooting at the range is not practice, it is simply measuring the effectiveness of your practice.

Unconscious incompetence is what we see at public ranges on a daily basis, where people don’t know what they don’t know. They believe they are practicing but in most cases they are only engraining bad habits and celebrate openly when they make one hit out of a magazine. 10% effectiveness is not success.

Conscious incompetence is where our students generally come from, they know they don’t know but want the knowledge and education.

Conscious competence is where we hope to have our students by the end of the first day of training, they have knowledge, and understanding and now know how to do something. They may to a large degree still have to consciously think about the individual steps to perform successfully. This can become the most frustrating stage of learning, because they may know what you need to do but have yet to have practiced enough for the skill to be unconsciously performed and often their technique will fall apart under the stress of performing on command. When we have students come back for additional training this is when the wheels fall off the bus, they know what they should do but have not committed the skill to memory.

Unconscious competence is when you can perform a skill without consciously thinking about it, while your attention is elsewhere, or under extreme stress. Driving without having a wreck is to a large degree an example of unconscious competence. Once you start the engine and engage the transmission your unconscious drives the process. If you were to actually try to cognitively recognize each visual and audible input and conscious plan a reaction you would have multiple accidents in one trip. When someone reaches this phase with a particular skill, it is generally called mastery, you can drive without endangering yours or others’ lives, hopefully.

DSC00218If your technique falls apart under stress, it’s a sign that you’re in the conscious competence stage and you need a combination of better mental control and more practice. If your technique doesn’t fall apart under stress, then it’s an indication that you have achieved unconscious competence and will want to gradually increase your speed and difficulty to stretch your skills even further.

Failing to train IS training to fail.
Liberty Firearms Training